WJPR Citation New

  All Since 2011
 Citation  2903  2393
 h-index  27  24
 i10-index  68  60

Login

Best Paper Awards

World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (WJPR) will give best paper award in every issue in the form of money along with certificate to promote research activity of scholar.
            Best Paper Award :
Dr. Muhammad Baqir MR Fakhrildin
Download Article: Click Here

Search

Track Your Article

Abstract

EPIGENETICS

*Anjali Kumari and Prof. J. S. Tripathi

ABSTRACT

Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene function that do not involve changes in the sequence. The Greek prefix epic- (ἐπι- "over, outside of, around") in epigenetics implies features that are "on top of" or "in addition to" the traditional genetic basis for inheritance. Epigenetics most often denotes changes in a chromosome that affect gene activity and expression, but can also be used to describe any heritable phenotypic change that does not derive from a modification of the genome, such as prions. Such effects on cellular and physiological phenotypic traits may result from external or environmental factors, or be part of normal developmental program. The standard definition of epigenetics requires these alterations to be heritable,[3][4] either in the progeny of cells or of organisms. The term also refers to the changes themselves: functionally relevant changes to the genome that do not involve a change in the nucleotide sequence. Examples of mechanisms that produce such changes are DNA methylation and histone modification, each of which alters how genes are expressed without altering the underlying DNA sequence. Gene expression can be controlled through the action of repressor proteins that attach to silencer regions of the DNA. These epigenetic changes may last through cell divisions for the duration of the cell's life, and may also last for multiple generations even though they do not involve changes in the underlying DNA sequence of the organism, instead, non-genetic factors cause the organism's genes to behave (or "express themselves") differently. One example of an epigenetic change in eukaryotic biology is the process of cellular differentiation. During morphogenesis, totipotent stem cells become the various pluripotent cell lines of the embryo, which in turn become fully differentiated cells. In other words, as a single fertilized egg cell – the zygote – continues to divide, the resulting daughter cells change into all the different cell types in an organism, including neurons, muscle cells, epithelium, endothelium of blood vessels, etc., by activating some genes while inhibiting the expression of others.

Keywords: Epigenetics is the study expression of others.


[Full Text Article]

Call for Paper

World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (WJPR)
Read More

Email & SMS Alert

World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (WJPR)
Read More

Article Statistics

World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (WJPR)
Read More

Online Submission

World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (WJPR)
Read More