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Abstract

NEGOTIATION-HEALTH & DISEASE WSR TO DENTITION

*Dr. Bishnupriya Mohanty, Mohit Kumar, Prof. (Dr.) Sangram Keshari Das

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Abstract

Wisdom teeth come in at the very back of our mouth, with one at the end of each row of teeth. They usually don’t develop fully until the ages of 18 to 24, and it is only then that they appear, if they do at all. These teeth are commonly thought of as “troublemakers” because there often isn’t enough space for them and they can cause problems. Wisdom teeth are thought to date back to our distant ancestors who had larger jaws and more teeth. Nowadays, most people’s jaws are too small for these “extra” teeth. For a while in the past, they were almost always pulled. But because they don’t always cause problems, and removing them can lead to other problems, dentists are now a bit more hesitant. Wisdom teeth, or "third molars", are the last teeth at the back of the arches of the upper and lower teeth. They are found between 1226 years, although wisdom teeth often erupt on their own between 1721 years. According to the AAOMS, 9 out of 10 people have at least one impacted wisdom tooth. Around the age of 6, our adult teeth begin to grow, replacing the baby teeth we were born with. In most people, the central incisors are the first to emerge, followed by the lateral incisors and first molars. By the age of 13, most of the permanent teeth are in place, except for the wisdom teeth, that is. Wisdom teeth are the last adult teeth to come out (complete the permanent dentition) Some people have no wisdom teeth, some only have 2 out of 4 and others have a full set. Unfortunately, if and when they come out on their own, wisdom teeth can cause a number of dental problems, including inflammation, swelling, and pain. When our faces haven't reached their full potential, wisdom teeth simply don't have enough room to emerge. As a result, they can be affected or infected. So many time people even in their full developed age don’t have 32 teeth.

Keywords: Dentition, Wisdom Teeth, Negotiation of Disease & Health, mineralisation.


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