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Abstract

A REVIEW ON ATOPIC DERMATITIS

Bhawna Malik*

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Abstract

Skin is the outer covering of the human body. Skin is one of the largest organs. Which establish 16% of the human body weight. Weight around 5kgs and cover about 2square meter area. It is a tissue in our body that duplicates the most and fastest.[1] Skin is the layer of usually soft, flexible, outer tissue covering the body of a vertebrate animal. Your skin, along with your hair, nails, oil glands and sweat glands, is part of the integumentary system. “Integumentary” means a body‟s outer covering.[2] Your skin have different thickness, colour, and texture all over your body. For example- our head contains more hair follicles than anywhere else. But soles of our feet have none. In fact, soles of our feet and palms of hand are thicker than skin on the other areas of your body. And the thinnest skin of the human body is around eyes (eyelids and the skin under the eyes). It protects our internal organs from the environment using a multi-layered system of cushioning, a cellular barrier, and protective oils. Skin is more than just a protective barrier between our insides and the environment – it also plays an active role in maintaining our health, such as regulating body temperature by sweating when we‟re hot. It can also produce Vitamin D, which is important for the health of our bones, from sunlight. The skin1 is one of the largest organs in the body in surface area and weight. The skin consists of two layers: the epidermis and the dermis. Beneath the dermis lies the hypodermis or subcutaneous fatty tissue. The skin has three main functions: protection, regulation and sensation. Wounding affects all the functions of the skin. The primary function of the skin is to act as a barrier. The skin provides protection from: mechanical impacts and pressure, variations in temperature, micro-organisms, radiation and chemicals. The skin regulates several aspects of physiology, including: body temperature via sweat and hair, and changes in peripheral circulation and fluid balance via sweat. It also acts as a reservoir for the synthesis of Vitamin D. The skin contains an extensive network of nerve cells that detect and relay changes in the environment. There are separate receptors for heat, cold, touch, and pain. Damage to these nerve cells is known as neuropathy, which results in a loss of sensation in the affected areas. Patients with neuropathy may not feel pain when they suffer injury, increasing the risk of severe wounding or the worsening of an existing wound.[3]

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