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Abstract

ASSESSMENT OF THE KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE REGARDING MEDICATION USE IN PREGNANT WOMEN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL CENTER IN MUKALLA DIRECTORATE– YEMEN

Muna Omar Salem Alkatheri*

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Abstract

Background: The possible teratogenic effects of various drugs and the mother's physiologic modifications and responses to pregnancy consider drug use during pregnancy a specific source of concern.[1,2] Due to the risk to both the mother's health and the life of the unborn child, drug use during pregnancy requires special consideration.[3] The medication or metabolite concentration may even be higher in the compartment containing the embryo or fetus than in the mother. The fetus is therefore treated as an "additional" patient and requires a careful pharmacotherapeutic strategy. Due to the fact that some women experience pregnancies with medical disorders that need for continuous and episodic therapy, complete avoidance of pharmacological treatment throughout pregnancy is not possible and may even be dangerous.[2] As a result, medications can occasionally be necessary for both the pregnant woman's and the fetus' health. In such circumstances, a woman should discuss the advantages and disadvantages of taking the medications with her doctor or other healthcare professionals. For instance, medication is necessary regardless of pregnancy for chronic disorders including epilepsy, bronchial asthma, diabetes mellitus, or infectious diseases.[2] Contrarily, inessential items including cough medicines, drugs that support pregnancy, and excessive doses of vitamins and minerals are not advised because of the potential hazards involved and the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use. Appropriate dispensing is one of the key steps for rational drug use including minimizing the use of teratogenic drugs during pregnancy.[4,5] It is necessary that a drug dispenser should have relevant and updated knowledge and skills regarding dispensing of drugs during pregnancy. A misperception of the risk may lead to inappropriate decisions Background: The possible teratogenic effects of various drugs and the mother's physiologic modifications and responses to pregnancy consider drug use during pregnancy a specific source of concern.[1,2] Due to the risk to both the mother's health and the life of the unborn child, drug use during pregnancy requires special consideration.[3] The medication or metabolite concentration may even be higher in the compartment containing the embryo or fetus than in the mother. The fetus is therefore treated as an "additional" patient and requires a careful pharmacotherapeutic strategy. Due to the fact that some women experience pregnancies with medical disorders that need for continuous and episodic therapy, complete avoidance of pharmacological treatment throughout pregnancy is not possible and may even be dangerous.[2] As a result, medications can occasionally be necessary for both the pregnant woman's and the fetus' health. In such circumstances, a woman should discuss the advantages and disadvantages of taking the medications with her doctor or other healthcare professionals. For instance, medication is necessary regardless of pregnancy for chronic disorders including epilepsy, bronchial asthma, diabetes mellitus, or infectious diseases.[2] Contrarily, inessential items including cough medicines, drugs that support pregnancy, and excessive doses of vitamins and minerals are not advised because of the potential hazards involved and the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use. Appropriate dispensing is one of the key steps for rational drug use including minimizing the use of teratogenic drugs during pregnancy.[4,5] It is necessary that a drug dispenser should have relevant and updated knowledge and skills regarding dispensing of drugs during pregnancy. A misperception of the risk may lead to inappropriate decisions for pregnancy outcomes. On the other hand, perception of risk may influence a woman's decision to take a needed drug during pregnancy.[6] Despite the fact that less than 30 medications have been demonstrated to cause severe abnormalities in humans, there is a prevalent impression that drugs are unsafe during pregnancy.[7] Avoidance of unnecessary use of drugs during pregnancy as well as knowledge and awareness of care providers and pregnant women concerning the harmful effect of drugs is of great significance. Lack of proper medication knowledge and practice among pregnant women might eventually have serious impacts on the health of both the mother and child. Thus, effective interventions are required to enhance the knowledge, attitude, and practice of pregnant women regarding safe medication during pregnancy.[1,2] Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of pregnant women at the University of Medical Center - Mukalla Directorate – Yemen. Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) Practice regarding medication use in pregnant women at the University of Medical Center in Mukalla Directorate - Yemen. Subject and Methods: The study design was a descriptive cross-sectional -based study carried out from (September-November) 2023 among 400 randomly pregnant women attend to clinics at the University of Medical Center. by using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: The statistical analysis for data obtained in this study showed that the majority percentage of the prevalence of drugs used during pregnancy was (52%), (49%) about half of pregnant women used drugs in the first trimester. Vitamins and antibiotics were the main drugs used (47%), (18%) respectively. (3%) of pregnant women who had children with congenital malformation. They had a positive awareness of the medication risks on the fetus in pregnant women, the main source of information was doctors (84%) but (2%), and (4%) of them they didn‘t know any things about the risk of the drugs on pregnant women or on the fetus and (4%) of them they had not any source of information, also we found that (45%) of the doctors didn‘t play a positive role to clarify the risk of the use of medicine to pregnant women to correct what we found in pregnant believes the highest percentage (59%) one was ― Drink vitamins and drugs may increase fetus size and difficult delivery‖. Conclusion: The present study indicates that the prevalence of drugs used during pregnancy was mainly vitamins and antibiotics were used, On the other hand, the doctors didn‘t play a positive role to clarify the risk of the use of medicine by pregnant women or fetuses correctly. Although doctors and pharmacists were the main sources of information for pregnant women. Also, we found that the Drink vitamins and drugs may increase fetus size and difficult delivery‖ was the opinion of most pregnantwomen. It is therefore an urgent need to make them aware of the risks of drugs to ensure the safe use of medicines for pregnant women and fetuses.

Keywords: KAP, Medication use, pregnant women, Muna Alkatheri.


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